Date: Thu, 9 Dec 2004 08:28:30 -0600
Subject: DPS Mailing #04-30:  In Memoriam:  William Quaide and Damon
 Simonelli
 
 
Greetings, DPS Colleagues,
 
 +------------------CONTENTS:------------------------------+
       1) IN MEMORIAM:  WILLIAM LEE QUAIDE
       2) IN MEMORIAM:  DAMON P. SIMONELLI
       3) WORKSHOP ON GRANULAR MATERIALS IN LUNAR AND MARTIAN EXPLORATION
 +----------------------------------------------------------+
 
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IN MEMORIAM:  WILLIAM LEE QUAIDE
 
Dr. William Lee Quaide, 77, former chief of the Planetary Science 
branch of NASA, died Nov. 10 of cancer at Inova Fairfax Hospital. 
He had lived in Burke since 1976.
 
He was a scientist for NASA for 29 years, the last 16 at its 
headquarters in Washington. He studied the first samples of lunar 
rocks and other materials that Apollo astronauts brought back 
from the moon.
 
Dr. Quaide started with NASA in 1963 at the Ames Research Center 
in Sunnyvale, Calif. After studying the physics of craters, he 
analyzed lunar samples and studied the origins and histories of 
planetary surfaces. He wrote about 40 journal articles based on 
his research.
 
In 1976, he came to Washington, serving as chief of the Lunar 
Data Analysis and Synthesis program from 1976 to 1978. He was 
a scientist with the Planetary Geophysics and Geochemistry 
Program from 1978 to 1985. From 1985 until his retirement in 
1992, he was chief of the Planetary Science branch.
 
Dr. Quaide was particularly interested in the geophysical 
composition of the planets, comets and meteors in the solar 
system. He saw the future of NASA's deep-space exploration in 
unmanned rockets and satellites returning scientific information 
to earth.
 
He received many awards during his tenure at NASA, including ones 
for outstanding research paper of the year and outstanding 
performance. He received the Edward A. Flinn III Award from the 
American Geophysical Union in 1992 and the Harold Masursky Award 
for meritorious service to planetary science from the American 
Astronomical Society in 1996.
 
Dr. Quaide was born in Paris, Ark., and grew up near San Diego. 
He served in the U.S. Navy from 1944 to 1946 and received three 
degrees in geology from the University of California at Berkeley, 
including a doctorate in 1956. He spent seven years as a teacher, 
museum curator and researcher at the University of California, 
Pomona College and San Jose State University before joining NASA.
 
Survivors include his wife of 46 years, Evelyn Brokenshire Quaide 
of Burke; two sons, Chet Davis Quaide of Castro Valley, Calif., 
and Rustin Adley Quaide of Silver Spring; a sister; and a 
granddaughter.
 
 
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IN MEMORIAM:  DAMON P. SIMONELLI (1959-2004)
 
Damon Simonelli passed away unexpectedly on December 1, 2004 
after he collapsed at his home near Pasadena, Calif. Damon was 
a longtime member of the DPS community, and attended the 2004 
meeting in Louisville where he presented a paper on the surface 
roughness of Phoebe based on Cassini VIMS observations.
 
Damon was born in the Bronx, New York, and graduated from the 
Bronx High School of Science in 1976. He graduated summa cum laude 
in physics from Cornell in 1980, and continued on for a PhD in 
Astronomy and Space Sciences with Joe Veverka. His thesis work 
and early publications were on the microphysical nature of Io's 
surface. He went to NASA Ames as a National Research Council (NRC) 
Research Associate to work with Jim Pollack on the interiors of 
Pluto and Charon and the carbon budget in the outer Solar System. 
Damon returned to Cornell, and with Veverka, Peter Thomas, and 
Paul Helfenstein, led a team to study the nature of the small, 
formerly uninteresting bodies of the Solar System, including 
the inner satellites of Jupiter that were imaged by the Galileo 
camera. Most recently he held a Senior NRC Research
Associateship with Bonnie Buratti at JPL. 
 
Damon was an avid cyclist, amateur actor, and hockey player, 
continuing his participation in a team even after his move from 
the great white north to sunny southern California. He had an 
encyclopedic knowledge of sports, movies, TV, and science fiction, 
and he owned a world class collection of Star Trek and
other science fiction memorabilia. Only Damon could manage to 
write a top composition for the New York State English Regents 
Exam that managed to mention the significance of Bicentennial 
toilet bowl covers. His unique and dry wit and keen scientific 
insights will be missed.
 
Damon's survivors include his mother and sister. A memorial 
service will be held on Friday December 10, 2004 at 11:00 AM 
at the Unitarian Universalist Church Throop Memorial at 
300 South Los Robles Avenue in Pasadena, CA.  Following services 
there will be a gathering at the home of Bonnie Buratti at 
2494 Boulder Rd. in Altadena.
 
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WORKSHOP ON GRANULAR MATERIALS IN LUNAR AND MARTIAN EXPLORATION
 
A Workshop on Granular Materials in Lunar and Martian Exploration 
is being held at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, 
February 2-3, 2005.  Abstracts are requested on the subject of 
lunar and Martian soil mechanics, physical properties of the 
regoliths, and related topics.  See the call for abstracts for 
further information.
 
http://weboflife.nasa.gov/regolith.htm
 
Philip Metzger
KSC Applied Physics Lab
YA-C3-E
NASA/KSC
321-867-6052
 
 
Linda French Emmons, DPS Secretary
send submissions to lfrench@iwu.edu 
Submissions should be in text format (no attachments, please).