Date: Mon, 30 Apr 2001 10:24:15 -0600 (MDT)
Subject: DPS Mailing #01-15: Triton, AAS Directory, Mert Davies 1918-2001

Greetings, DPS Members-
 
       +------------------CONTENTS:-----------------------------+
       |1) Triton Watch                                         |
       |2) 2002 AAS DIRECTORY UPDATES                           |
       |3) Mert Davies, 1918-2001                               |
       +--------------------------------------------------------+

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The Triton Watch project is preparing for this year's Neptune/Triton
observing season and is soliciting observers to join the effort.   The
primary goal of the campaign is to monitor the photometric behavior of
Triton, and to provide a quick and robust mechanism to follow up observed
color changes.  

You can obtain more information about the Triton Watch
project and sign up at: http://www.boulder.swri.edu/TritonWatch.

If you have questions, you can contact the project administrators
(Alan Stern, Joel Parker, Dirk Terrell) at TritonWatch@boulder.swri.edu

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4.  2002 DIRECTORY UPDATES

Directory Deadline for Member and Institutional Updates: 3 August 2001

The AAS Membership Directory for 2002 contains information
from our member and institutional database as of August 2001.  
Email to mailto:address@aas.org member address information 
changes and revisions or new material for the institutional
listings at the back of the Directory by 3 August 2001.

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Merton Davies, 83, Mapper of Orbs and a Satellite Pioneer Is Dead

excerpted from his New York Times obituary:

"Merton Edward Davies, a celestial mapmaker and a pioneer in spy
satellite technology, died on Tuesday at a hospital in Santa
Monica, Calif. A resident of nearby Pacific Palisades, he was 83.
Mr. Davies went to work for the Rand Corporation in 1947 and
remained there until his death. He became one of the world's
foremost experts in using deep-space photographs to map the
planets, a process known as planetary photogrammetry. His career
spanned from the earliest orbiter missions to the Moon to marathon
voyages to Mars, Venus, Mercury and the satellites of Jupiter and
Saturn...

"Mert has single-handedly observed more of the solar system than
any other human," said Torrence Johnson, project scientist of
Project Galileo."

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                      Nick Schneider, on behalf of the DPS Committee
                      (submissions to Al Harris: awharris@lithos.jpl.nasa.gov)